Postdoctoral Fellows and Visiting Scholars

Dr. Rebecca Graff-McRae
Office:  11-26 H.M. Tory Building
Email:  r.graff@ualberta.ca 

Rebecca Graff-McRae is a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Post-doctoral Fellow. Her research centres on the role of historical memory and commemoration in political conflict and processes of post-conflict transition. While conflict memory is often characterized as either ‘excessive’ memory - as a contributing factor in prolonged conflict -  or as a mode of ‘truth-telling’ and forgetting necessary for reconciliation, she argues for an analysis of contested commemorations as not only an indicator of ‘conflict by other means’, but equally as a force for reconfiguring post-conflict political dynamics. This project, ‘Neither Prison Nor Museum: the Politics of Conflict Memory in Northern Ireland’ asks how frequently conflicting Republican and Unionist commemorations function to influence and transform the political landscape in the current phase of transition – particularly the negotiation of “legacy” issues and the ongoing process of “dealing with the past”. Her work in this area has been published in Nordic Irish Studies (2014) and will be featured in a forthcoming special issue of Ethnopolitics. Rebecca peviously held a Faculty of Arts Research Fellowship at Memorial University, Newfoundland, which explored the role of narrative in historical discourse. Her doctoral work was undertaken at Queen's University Belfast, under the auspices of the cross-border project “1916 in 1966: Commemorating the Golden Jubilee”. This work argued that the negotiation of remembrance and forgetting is a political dynamic which both reflects and challenges the terms of conflict. A monograph derived from this research, Remembering and Forgetting 1916: Commemoration and Conflict in Post-Peace Process Ireland, was published by Irish Academic Press in 2010.


Dr. Ethel Tungohan
Office:  11-26 H.M. Tory Building
Email:  Tungohan@ualberta.ca

Ethel Tungohan is a Grant Notley Postdoctoral Fellow.  Her current project examines the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) in Alberta and British Columbia, building on her previous research on the Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP) and migrant activism. Along with research partners from Gabriela-Ontario, York University, and Ryerson University, she is part of a SSHRC Insight Grant funded project that examines former live-in caregivers’ experiences transitioning and settling into Canada upon finishing the LCP.  Other research interests include Labour Migration, Migration and Global Diaspora Studies, Public Policy, Canadian Politics, and Race, Class, Sex and Gender Analysis. She has published a number of journal articles and book chapters on themes relating to immigration policy, gender, migrant domestic workers, and tobacco control policies and international public health.  She is also the co-editor of Disturbing Invisibility:  Filipinos in Canada (University of Toronto Press, 2012).


Dr. Ghada Ageel
Office:  10-28 H.M. Tory Building
E-mail: ageel@ualberta.ca

Dr. Ghada Ageel is a Visiting Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Alberta. She holds a PhD and MA in Middle East Politics from the University of Exeter (Britain) and a BA in Education from the Islamic University/Gaza. Her PhD dissertation examined the historic and contemporary role of the United Nations Relief and Work Agency (UNRWA) in relation to the question of a durable solution for Palestinian refugees.

Dr. Ageel is the recipient of several awards and scholarships including The Phillips Grant (UK, 2013), The Jerusalem Studies’ Scholarship of the University of Exeter (2002 and 1999), the Higher Education Award of the Ministry of Education (Palestine, 1996) and the Hebrew Language and Literature Scholarship (Gaza, 1993).

Her research interests focus on rights-based approaches to forced migration, Palestinian refugees in comparative perspective, oral history, women's studies, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the permanent status issues involved in the Middle East peace process. Dr. Ageel's work has been widely published in several newspapers, magazines and journals worldwide, including The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, The International Herald Tribune, The Hill, CNN, BBC, The Guardian, Journal for Palestine Studies, Palestine Chronicle, MATAN Magazine (Hebrew), Occupation Magazine and many Arabic newspapers throughout the Middle East.

In addition to her book with Dr. Ibrahim Abu Jaber, Wisam Afifi, Maisam Eid, et all “Jurh Al-Nakba: Part 1” The Wound of Nakba, Part 1, Um Al-Fahem, Centre of Contemporary Studies, 2003; Dr. Ageel is currently working on a book project: The Palestinian Nakba and Israeli Apartheid : The Law and The Experience. She is also active in Faculty4Palestine—Alberta.


Dr. Jatinder Mann
Office:  11-24 H.M. Tory Building
Email:  jatinder.mann@ualberta.ca

Jatinder Mann is a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Alberta. He is working on a project on ‘The end of the British World and the redefinition of citizenship in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, 1950s-1970s’. Jatinder has published articles in the Australian Journal of Politics and History, Nations and Nationalism, and Commonwealth & Comparative Politics – all front-ranking, international journals. He also has a forthcoming article in the International Journal of Canadian Studies, another leading interdisciplinary journal. Jatinder is contracted as a co-editor in the production of Documents on Australian Foreign Policy on War and Peace, 1914-1919, which is scheduled to be published in April 2016. He has presented numerous conference and seminar papers all across the world. Jatinder was awarded his doctorate in history at The University of Sydney in 2011 for a thesis entitled 'The search for a new national identity: A comparative study of the rise of multiculturalism in Canada and Australia, 1890s-1970s'. He was short-listed for the ‘Best Doctoral Thesis in Canadian Studies Award’ by the International Council for Canadian Studies in November 2012. Jatinder was also a recipient of the prestigious Endeavour International Postgraduate Research Scholarship (EIPRS) by the Australian government and an International Postgraduate Award (IPA) by The University of Sydney for his doctoral research. Previously he completed an MA in Australian studies at King's College London; and a BA in history at University College London, with First Class Honours.

Dr. Jack Lucas
Office:  11-24 H.M. Tory Building
Email:  jack.lucas@ualberta.ca

 Jack Lucas is a Killam Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Political Science at the University  of Alberta. He completed his Ph.D. in July, 2014 at the University of Toronto, and he also holds an  M.A. from the University of Toronto and a B.A. from the University of Waterloo. Jack’s research  focuses on processes of institutional and policy change at the local level in Canada. His work has  been published inUrban History Review and Journal of Canadian Studies.